Specialists aren’t that special

Learn negotiating tactics from an FBI agent. This week's Roundup includes tips on preparing for your interview, what kind of mentors you should have in your life, and career advice from women leaders. Also, find out why being a generalist is better than being a specialists and success tips for becoming an entrepreneur.

Generalists Get Better Job Offers Than Specialists
HARVARD BUSINESS REVIEW
Are you better off being a jack-of-all-trades? Research says so. A study found that generalists earned up to $48,000 more than their specialist peers. Because conventional career advice calls for a niche, specialization becomes commodified. This gives you less bargaining power because you’re easily substitutable. In contrast, people who’ve demonstrated talent and transferable skills across different areas have an edge.
 

5 Mentor Every Entrepreneur Needs
INC.
Learn from the best. Find these types of mentors who can skyrocket your career: 1) The established professional. 2) The lateral colleague –someone you can relate to. 3) The outspoken individual –someone who’s not afraid to voice their opinion. 4) The friend who knew you before you took the leap. 5) The liaison –someone who will help you grow your network.

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The 5 Brilliant Emotional Intelligence Tactics This FBI Agent Uses to Negotiate

INC.
Don’t count on your poker face. Leverage emotional intelligence when negotiating: 1) Build rapport by selectively mirroring words. 2) Use empathy strategically. 3) Ask no-oriented questions to give the other person a sense of control and security. 4) Rephrase and summarize. 5) Work with them, not against them. The more they like you, the more flexible they’ll be.

Keen to Change the World? Launch Your Own Initiative!
LINKEDIN
Nine out of ten startups fail. Be the 10%: Let your ideas flow but be realistic. Flatter your early customers. They will be the best referrals. Understand your competitors as much as you understand your own project. Master your pitch –you usually only have 30 seconds so be catchy, creative, clear, and concise. Stay positive amidst challenges you’ll face. Attitude will balance a skill gap, lack of seniority, or deficit of expertise.

8 Inspiring Women Leaders Share Their Best Advice For 2016 Grads
FORTUNE
Graduation = Inspiration. Whether you are a new graduate or a seasoned professional, everyone needs some inspiration from time-to-time like, “The ‘uh-oh’ moments are worth cherishing just as much as ‘ah-ha’ moments. Mistakes, failures, embarrassments, and disappointments are a necessary component of growing wise.”

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Mind Your Manners: What to Do When You Interview
AKKENCLOUD
Make a good first impression to stand out. Rehearse to avoid “ums” and “likes.” Give yourself enough time to get to the interview and freshen up first. Dress appropriately for the company, turn off your cell phone, and practice your handshake beforehand. When in the interview, sit still with good posture and don’t cross your arms. And make sure you send a thank you email the day of the interview.

After the Trophy Hunt, the Job Search: Omaha Company Helps Pro Athletes Find a New Field
OMAHA.COM
Life after pro sports? Sportified Recruit is a start-up company that helps retired athletes and Olympians transition into the corporate world. From scoring goals to scoring a job, they’re closing the gap for sports professionals whose resumes don’t necessarily boast office experience by emphasizing their hard work and entrepreneurship.

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The Art of Not Working at Work
THE ATLANTIC
"Cyberloafing" is on the rise. 60 percent of online purchases are made during working hours and we spend 1.5-3 hours of our workday on private activities, according to research. Although slacking at work may seem blissful, most of us will eventually crave more meaningful pursuits, says Roland Paulson, author of Empty Ladder. Read the Article»

ecommerce.jpg
The Art of Not Working at Work
THE ATLANTIC
"Cyberloafing" is on the rise. 60 percent of online purchases are made during working hours and we spend 1.5-3 hours of our workday on private activities, according to research. Although slacking at work may seem blissful, most of us will eventually crave more meaningful pursuits, says Roland Paulson, author of Empty Ladder. Read the Article»

ecommerce.jpg
The Art of Not Working at Work
THE ATLANTIC
"Cyberloafing" is on the rise. 60 percent of online purchases are made during working hours and we spend 1.5-3 hours of our workday on private activities, according to research. Although slacking at work may seem blissful, most of us will eventually crave more meaningful pursuits, says Roland Paulson, author of Empty Ladder. Read the Article»

ecommerce.jpg
The Art of Not Working at Work
THE ATLANTIC
"Cyberloafing" is on the rise. 60 percent of online purchases are made during working hours and we spend 1.5-3 hours of our workday on private activities, according to research. Although slacking at work may seem blissful, most of us will eventually crave more meaningful pursuits, says Roland Paulson, author of Empty Ladder. Read the Article»

ecommerce.jpg
The Art of Not Working at Work
THE ATLANTIC
"Cyberloafing" is on the rise. 60 percent of online purchases are made during working hours and we spend 1.5-3 hours of our workday on private activities, according to research. Although slacking at work may seem blissful, most of us will eventually crave more meaningful pursuits, says Roland Paulson, author of Empty Ladder. Read the Article»

ecommerce.jpg
The Art of Not Working at Work
THE ATLANTIC
"Cyberloafing" is on the rise. 60 percent of online purchases are made during working hours and we spend 1.5-3 hours of our workday on private activities, according to research. Although slacking at work may seem blissful, most of us will eventually crave more meaningful pursuits, says Roland Paulson, author of Empty Ladder. Read the Article»

ecommerce.jpg
The Art of Not Working at Work
THE ATLANTIC
"Cyberloafing" is on the rise. 60 percent of online purchases are made during working hours and we spend 1.5-3 hours of our workday on private activities, according to research. Although slacking at work may seem blissful, most of us will eventually crave more meaningful pursuits, says Roland Paulson, author of Empty Ladder. Read the Article»

ecommerce.jpg
The Art of Not Working at Work
THE ATLANTIC
"Cyberloafing" is on the rise. 60 percent of online purchases are made during working hours and we spend 1.5-3 hours of our workday on private activities, according to research. Although slacking at work may seem blissful, most of us will eventually crave more meaningful pursuits, says Roland Paulson, author of Empty Ladder. Read the Article»

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