Who run the (corporate) world? Beyoncé.

So how much does a school bus weigh? In this week’s Roundup, learn to tackle brainteasers, how to run your career like Beyoncé, and what Google discovered when its teams of A-players kept underperforming. Also, get a five-step plan for landing a promotion without asking for one as well as other interviewing tips and tricks.

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How to Run Your Career Like Beyoncé
MASHABLE
Who run the board meeting? Beyoncé. Queen B’s corporate strategy involves being surrounded by good people, doing the unexpected, and keeping tabs on every business decision, big and small. She’s known for standing behind her ideals and controlling the narrative. Embrace the “Beyoncé Philosophy.”

Your 5-Step Plan to Getting a Promotion Without Having to Ask for It
THE MUSE
No one wants to ask for a promotion, but everyone wants one. The key is to let your actions speak louder than your words. Go “above and beyond.” Focus on growth, not status. Identify your weaknesses and embrace self-improvement. Look for long-term projects that prove you’re ready for more responsibility. Lastly, work collaboratively because teamwork can turn more heads than leadership.

What Google Learned From Its Quest to Build the Perfect Team
THE NEW YORK TIMES
Psychological safety is what makes great teams tick. That’s the conclusion from a two-year internal study of 180 teams at Google. Psychological safety is "a sense of confidence that the team will not embarrass, reject, or punish someone for speaking up." The lack of this safety net explains why teams of A-players underperform while the presence of it allows teams to be greater than the sum of its parts.

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14 Ideas for What to Say When a Job Interviewer Asks “Any Questions for Me?”
MEDIUM
“How do employees earn a ‘gold star’?” “Who are the heroes of the office?” Asking these give you an idea of what they look for in an employee, and an opportunity to prove you can match it. Show your interest in the interviewer. Ask how they got started in the industry. The more interest you show in others, the more interest they’ll have in you.

What to Say if a Hiring Manager Asks 'Who Are You Voting For?' During a Job Interview
BUSINESS INSIDER
An interview is no place for politics. Saying too much can destroy your impression. For once, being non-committal can save you. Insinuate you haven’t decided on a candidate or use a joke to brush off the question. Be neutral and appreciate the interviewer’s views without stating yours, with phrases like “I can see why you’d feel that way.”

Saying You're Passionate is Pretty Cliché — Go with This Instead
MASHABLE
Stop being vague and redundant. The word “passionate” is grossly overused. Instead, share stories that prove you’ll stop at nothing to get the job done. Demonstrate your creativity. Establish that you’re hungry to learn. Reference volunteer experience, school projects, and online classes. Say anything but “passion.”

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9 Steps to Solving an Impossible Brain Teaser in a Tech Interview (Without Breaking a Sweat)
THE MUSE
“How many windows are there in New York City?” If you’re interviewing for a tech job, chances are you’ll get thrown a brain teaser like this. These questions aren’t about the answer, they’re about the process. Demonstrate your curiosity, logical analysis, and clear communication by asking clarifying question, stating your assumptions, and providing a roadmap.

5 Mind Tricks to Help You Get into the Work Zone and Back out Again
MASHABLE
1) Compartmentalize your playlists to get you in the zone; 2) Schedule some time for mini-breaks to give your brain a rest; 3) Set achievable daily goals to avoid being overwhelmed with unrealistic to-dos; 4) Embrace daily rituals at the beginning and end of each day to help keep work and life separate; 5) Use the ‘if and then’ method to reward yourself if you get your work done.

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The Art of Not Working at Work
THE ATLANTIC
"Cyberloafing" is on the rise. 60 percent of online purchases are made during working hours and we spend 1.5-3 hours of our workday on private activities, according to research. Although slacking at work may seem blissful, most of us will eventually crave more meaningful pursuits, says Roland Paulson, author of Empty Ladder. Read the Article»

ecommerce.jpg
The Art of Not Working at Work
THE ATLANTIC
"Cyberloafing" is on the rise. 60 percent of online purchases are made during working hours and we spend 1.5-3 hours of our workday on private activities, according to research. Although slacking at work may seem blissful, most of us will eventually crave more meaningful pursuits, says Roland Paulson, author of Empty Ladder. Read the Article»

ecommerce.jpg
The Art of Not Working at Work
THE ATLANTIC
"Cyberloafing" is on the rise. 60 percent of online purchases are made during working hours and we spend 1.5-3 hours of our workday on private activities, according to research. Although slacking at work may seem blissful, most of us will eventually crave more meaningful pursuits, says Roland Paulson, author of Empty Ladder. Read the Article»

ecommerce.jpg
The Art of Not Working at Work
THE ATLANTIC
"Cyberloafing" is on the rise. 60 percent of online purchases are made during working hours and we spend 1.5-3 hours of our workday on private activities, according to research. Although slacking at work may seem blissful, most of us will eventually crave more meaningful pursuits, says Roland Paulson, author of Empty Ladder. Read the Article»

ecommerce.jpg
The Art of Not Working at Work
THE ATLANTIC
"Cyberloafing" is on the rise. 60 percent of online purchases are made during working hours and we spend 1.5-3 hours of our workday on private activities, according to research. Although slacking at work may seem blissful, most of us will eventually crave more meaningful pursuits, says Roland Paulson, author of Empty Ladder. Read the Article»

ecommerce.jpg
The Art of Not Working at Work
THE ATLANTIC
"Cyberloafing" is on the rise. 60 percent of online purchases are made during working hours and we spend 1.5-3 hours of our workday on private activities, according to research. Although slacking at work may seem blissful, most of us will eventually crave more meaningful pursuits, says Roland Paulson, author of Empty Ladder. Read the Article»

ecommerce.jpg
The Art of Not Working at Work
THE ATLANTIC
"Cyberloafing" is on the rise. 60 percent of online purchases are made during working hours and we spend 1.5-3 hours of our workday on private activities, according to research. Although slacking at work may seem blissful, most of us will eventually crave more meaningful pursuits, says Roland Paulson, author of Empty Ladder. Read the Article»

ecommerce.jpg
The Art of Not Working at Work
THE ATLANTIC
"Cyberloafing" is on the rise. 60 percent of online purchases are made during working hours and we spend 1.5-3 hours of our workday on private activities, according to research. Although slacking at work may seem blissful, most of us will eventually crave more meaningful pursuits, says Roland Paulson, author of Empty Ladder. Read the Article»

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