It's Time to Retune Your Resumé

This week we look at the impact that career centers have on future donations, at the effect of pre-set asks on fundraising, and more.

 
Students Who Get Better Career Guidance Remember College More Fondly
NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO
High quality and helpful career services departments leads to "dramatically" increased alumni engagement. It's not all about what you studied or where you went, it's about whether or not you had high quality experiences. Focusing on providing great service to students helps schools grow in the long run.

College Career Offices Boost Job Prospects, Alumni Gifts 
WALL STREET JOURNAL
Providing excellent career services helps both students and universities. A majority of the students taking advantage of career centers at school have positive experiences and land good jobs after graduation. The problem is only a relatively small percentage of people are using the services. Doing so would help alleviate some stress, not only for students, but for the university as well. People finding good jobs through career centers often look back on their college experiences more fondly and are more likely to donate money after they graduate.

When and How Fundraisers Should Suggest How Much to Donate
HARVARD BUSINESS REVIEW
To default or not to default? When fundraising online or by direct mail, fundraisers are often apprehensive about using defaults. Harvard’s studies found that setting low or high amounts as the default had very different effects on donation decisions. Low defaults encouraged potential donors to participate while high defaults resulted in larger donations from existing donors.

7 Skills You Should Have on Your Résumé If You Want to Land a Work-From-Home Job
BUSINESS INSIDER
Landing a work-from-home job means modifying your resume. While there are technical skills that could increase the job possibilities, there are also many general skills you shouldn’t forget to include, such as time management.

The Best Time to Retune Your Career? It’s Probably Right Now
NEW YORK TIMES
New year, new you (professionally). The time couldn't be better for you to improve your career by asking for a raise, finding a new job, or finding happiness at work. It just takes some preparation, observation, and improvisation.

Research: How Subtle Class Cues Can Backfire on Your Resume 
HARVARD BUSINESS REVIEW
Pedigree matters. What happens when you send four identical versions of a resume to 147 top law firms, alternating only the genders (James vs. Julia) and the extracurriculars to signal either an upper class or a lower class background (e.g., sailing vs. track and field)? Wildly different callback rates. Upper class men did best, getting 13x more callbacks than lower class men. Lower class women were a distant second, whereas upper class women came in third. Lawyers reported a reluctance to hire upper class women because it wasn't believed that they'd be as committed to their careers.

What To Remove From Your Resume In 2017
FORBES
Make sure your resume tells employers why they should hire you, not just what you've done. 40% of people surveyed said they were looking for new jobs this year, so we need to make sure that we are always putting our best foot forward.

7 Warning Signs Your Potential Employer Has a Toxic Culture
INC
Have you ever worked for a company that has a culture that is so toxic it made your work and personal life miserable? Ignoring these 7 signs can lead to several unpleasant side effects such as anxiety, insomnia, and high stress. Save yourself some grief and don't ignore these signs.

Don’t Let Inexperience Stop You from Participating in Meetings
HARVARD BUSINESS REVIEW
Offering your opinion at meetings could get you ahead. First, gauge your company culture. Keep an eye out for future meetings so you can prepare. When you participate, make sure you share something valuable that will show senior staff your potential. Meetings can be a perfect opportunity for junior staff to learn, prove themselves, cultivate relationships, and get more involved in their organization.

Stop Setting Goals You Don’t Actually Care About
HARVARD BUSINESS REVIEW
The secret to achieving all your goals this new year may be simpler than you thinkTo begin thinking of your own professional development goals, start by asking yourself three questions: If I could accomplish just one major professional development goal in 2017, what would it be When I think about working on this goal, do I get excited about the process as well as the outcome? Is my motivation to pursue this goal intrinsic, something coming from within because it is personally interesting and important, or is it extrinsic, something that I feel would please other people?

Entrepreneurs don’t have a special gene for risk—they come from families with money
QUARTZ
What's better than a million dollar idea? A million dollar uncle, of course. This citation-rich article summarizes one of the best-kept secrets in entrepreneurship; the most common trait among successful entrepreneurs isn’t grit, it’s access to cold, hard cash.

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